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Deadline Extended for 2016 ASLE Symposium in New Mexico

2016 February 11
by Shared by Steve Rust

Call for Papers

The Heart of the Gila: Wilderness and Water in the West

Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) 2016 Off-Year Symposium

June 8-11, 2016
Western New Mexico University
Silver City, NM

asle.wnmu.edu

Deadline Extended to March 15, 2016

Letting our location be our guide in focusing the theme, the Gila Wilderness was established as the nation’s first wilderness area 91 years ago and continues to define our regional identity. The Gila River remains the last free-flowing river in the Southwest, but there is a current proposal in the state legislature to dam the river; local activists have been organizing to fight the proposal. Drought, compounded by climate change, has greatly affected our area, with the largest fire in New Mexico state history occurring in the Gila during 2012. The Gila was the northernmost region of the Mogollon People a millennium ago, and our region remains very culturally diverse with its close proximity to the Mexican-U.S. border.

We invite papers, roundtables, presentations, creative work, video presentations, and discussions from a range of disciplines and academic backgrounds that explore the past present, and future of wilderness, mythology of the West, Old West, New West, water, drought, climate change, desert, wastelands, atomic testing sites, military and western space, rivers, dams, tourism, fire, forest management, native cultures, migrant cultures, borders, activism, rhetoric of place, writers of place, writers of the West and Southwest (Aldo Leopold, Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, too many to name), wilderness philosophy, and diversity in the West. We invite participants to interpret the theme broadly. We especially welcome creative writers, activists, graduate students, and academics working in the humanities and beyond to consider submitting to the symposium.

Symposium sessions will be 90-minutes long. Both scholarly and creative submissions are welcome. Pre- formed panels are encouraged.

  •   proposals for pre-formed panels must include at least four presentations (papers, readings, provocations, responses, etc.), 15 minutes-max each, plus a chair; panel organizers must submit the proposal on behalf of all panelists (500 word abstract for the panel outlining topic, format, participants’ roles; 300 word abstract for each contribution as relevant to the format; all contact information)
  •   proposals for panels may also include roundtables (five or six 10 minute-max presentations plus discussion)
  •   individual paper/reading/performance submissions are for 15 minute presentations; 300 word abstracts should describe both form and content and include all contact information

Please submit your proposal by March 15, 2016 on-line at asle.wnmu.edu. We will notify you of its final status by March 21, 2016.

For questions about submissions, the program, the symposium site, or field trips, please contact the symposium organizer Dr. Michaelann Nelson at Michaelann.Nelson@wnmu.edu.

Plenary Speakers

Our list of invited speakers includes writers and scholars that are inspired by the people, culture, and landscape of our region in the Southwest.

  •   David Gessner is the author of nine books, including All the Wild That Remains: Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner and the American West, as well as, My Green Manifesto, and The Tarball Chronicles, which won the 2012 Reed Award for Best Book on the Southern Environment and ASLE’s award for best book of creative writing in 2011 and 2012.
  •   Sharman Russell, author of Diary of a Citizen Scientist: Chasing Tiger Beetles and Other New Ways of Engaging the World (WILLA Award Winner), as well as a dozen other books, writes primarily about nature and the southwest. She makes her home in the Gila.
  •   Dave Foreman, founder of the direct action environmental group EarthFirst!, has written several books, including Confessions of an Eco-Warrior and Ecodefense: A Field Guide to Monkeywrenching. He is currently the director of the Rewilding Institute, a think tank dedicated to promoting conservation and species extinction.
  •   Lucy Tapahonso, Navajo Nation Poet Laureate, and author of several books of poetry, including The Women are Singing and Blue Horses Rush In. Her poetry is inspired by the idea that the feminine is a source of balance and power in the world.
  •   Priscilla Ybarra, author of The Good Life: Mexican American Writing and the Environment. Dr. Ybarra’s work investigates Mexican American literature and environmental issues. She is a professor of English at the University of North Texas.
  •   Phillip Connors, author of Fire Season: Field Notes From a Wilderness Lookout (National Outdoor Book Award, Sigurd Olsen Nature Writing Award), has spent the last decade as a fire lookout in the Gila National Forest. He previously was an editor at the Wall Street Journal.

    Travel Awards

    We will offer ten awards of $250 each to graduate students and independent scholars to help defray the cost of attending the symposium. Information on how to apply can be found on the website.

    Symposium Location

    Western New Mexico University is a diverse, public, regional university with about 3,500 students. Silver City is located in southwestern New Mexico at 6,000 feet elevation. It is the gateway to the Gila National Wilderness Area, the United States’ first wilderness area, as well as Gila Cliff Dwelling National Monument. It is known for its vibrant art community, locavore food scene, and all-around funky downtown. It has been recently named one of the top 20 small towns to visit by Smithsonian Magazine.

New Book! Sustainable Media, edited by Nicole Starosielski and Janet Walker

2016 February 9
by Shared by Steve Rust

Sustainable Media explores the many ways that media and environment are intertwined from the exploitation of natural and human resources during media production to the installation and disposal of media in the landscape; from people’s engagement with environmental issues in film, television, and digital media to the mediating properties of ecologies themselves. Edited by Nicole Starosielski and Janet Walker, the assembled chapters expose how the social and representational practices of media culture are necessarily caught up with technologies, infrastructures, and environments.Through in-depth analyses of media theories, practices, and objects including cell phone towers, ecologically-themed video games, Geiger counters for registering radiation, and sound waves traveling through the ocean, contributors question the sustainability of the media we build, exchange, and inhabit and chart emerging alternatives for media ecologies.

 

Introduction

Janet Walker and Nicole Starosielski, Introduction: Sustainable Media

Part One: Resource Media

1. Hunter Vaughan, 500,000 Kilowatts of Stardust: An Eco-Materialist Reframing of Singin’ in the Rain

2. Nicole Starosielski, Pipeline Ecologies: Rural Entanglements of Fiber-Optic Cables

3. Shane Brennan, Making Data Sustainable: Backup Culture and Risk Perception

4. Colin Milburn, “Ain’t No Way Offa This Train:” Final Fantasy VII and the Pwning of Environmental Crisis

Part Two: Social Ecologies, Mediating Environments

5. Rahul Mukherjee, Mediating Infrastructures: (Im)Mobile Toxicity and Cell Antenna Publics

6. Minori Ishida, The Lack of Media: The Invisible Domain post 3.11

7. John Shiga, Ping and the Material Meanings of Ocean Sound

8. Amy Rust, “Going the Distance:” Steadicam’s Ecological Aesthetic

Part Three: (Un)sustainable Materialities

9. Sean Cubitt, Ecologies of Fabrication

10. Jennifer Gabrys, Re-thingifying the Internet of Things

11. Jussi Parikka, So-called Nature: Friedrich Kittler and Ecological Media Materialism

Part Four: Scaling, Modeling, Coupling

12. Alenda Y. Chang, Think Microscopically, Act Galactically? The Science of Scale in Video Games

13. Bishnupriya Ghosh, Toward Symbiosis: Human-viral Futures in the “Molecular Movies”

14. Erica Robles-Anderson and Max Liboiron, Coupling Complexity: Ecology, Cybernetics, and Non-Representational Modes of Environmental Action

15. Peter Krapp, The Invisible Axis: From Polar Media to Planetary Networks

2016 February 7
by Shared by Steve Rust

Dear Ecomedia Community:

Dear ASLE Member,

 

My name is Jennifer Irish, and I am the Program Assistant for the study abroad program titled Learning and Service Journey into Amazonia at Florida State University. Dr. Juan Carlos Galeano, a fellow member of ASLE, is the Program Director, and we both feel that this program will be of interest to you and your students.

 

Journey into Amazonia is a Service Learning Program in the Peruvian Amazon that takes place annually during the month of July. By using interdisciplinary perspectives from cultural anthropology, spiritual ecology, and environmental studies, as well as internships and/or research experience in Amazonian communities, students of this program can gain deeper understanding about landscape, cultural systems of Amazonia, philosophy of life and history of native groups, colonists and farmers. A photographic essay created by a former participant last summer can be viewed at: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5laV3ZBTicAQlY3YnBDUU5mZm8/view?usp=sharing

The official program website is: http://www.international.fsu.edu/types/College/Peru/Default.aspx and more detailed information on the program, including assessments from previous participants, can be found on Dr. Galeano’s website http://myweb.fsu.edu/jgaleano in the section Journey into Amazonia.

If you have any questions about the program, please feel free to contact myself or Dr. Galeano at jgaleano@fsu.edu
We hope that you are having a great semester!
Warmly,
Jennifer
 

Jennifer Irish

Graduate Teaching Assistant of Spanish
Program Assistant for Journey into Amazonia 
Modern Languages and Linguistics
Florida State University
jirish@fsu.edu

Conference CFP: ASLE Off-year Symposium on Wilderness and Water in the West

2016 February 4
by Shared by Steve Rust

The Heart of the Gila: Wilderness and Water in the West

June 8-11, 2016
Western New Mexico University, Silver City, NM
asle.wnmu.edu (a work in progress)
Call for Papers (PDF)

Deadline Extended:  March 15, 2016

Letting our location be our guide in focusing the theme, the Gila Wilderness was established as the nation’s first wilderness area 91 years ago and continues to define our regional identity. The Gila River remains the last free-flowing river in the Southwest, but there is a current proposal in the state legislature to dam the river; local activists have been organizing to fight the proposal. Drought, compounded by climate change, has greatly affected our area, with the largest fire in New Mexico state history occurring in the Gila during 2012.  The Gila was the northernmost region of the Mogollon People a millennium ago, and our region remains very culturally diverse with its close proximity to the Mexican-U.S. border.

We invite papers, roundtables, presentations, creative work, video presentations, and discussions from a range of disciplines and academic backgrounds that explore the past present, and future of wilderness, mythology of the West, Old West, New West, water, drought, climate change, desert, wastelands, atomic testing sites, military and western space, rivers, dams, tourism, fire, forest management, native cultures, migrant cultures, borders, activism, rhetoric of place, writers of place, writers of the West and Southwest (Aldo Leopold, Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, too many to name), wilderness philosophy, and diversity in the West. We invite participants to interpret the theme broadly. We especially welcome creative writers, activists, graduate students, and academics working in the humanities and beyond to consider submitting to the symposium.

Symposium sessions will be 90-minutes long. Both scholarly and creative submissions are welcome. Pre-formed panels are encouraged.

  • proposals for pre-formed panels must include at least four presentations (papers, readings, provocations, responses, etc.), 15 minutes-max each, plus a chair; panel organizers must submit the proposal on behalf of all panelists (500 word abstract for the panel outlining topic, format, participants’ roles; 300 word abstract for each contribution as relevant to the format; all contact information)
  • proposals for panels may also include roundtables (five or six 10 minute-max presentations plus discussion)
  • individual paper/reading/performance submissions are for 15 minute presentations; 300 word abstracts should describe both form and content and include all contact information

Deadline Extended: Please submit your proposal by March 15, 2016 online at asle.wnmu.edu. We will notify you of its final status by March 7, 2016.  For questions about submissions, the program, the symposium site, or field trips, please contact the symposium organizer Dr. Michaelann Nelson at Michaelann.Nelson@wnmu.edu.

Plenary Speakers
Our list of invited speakers includes writers and scholars that are inspired by the people, culture, and landscape of our region in the Southwest. The list of speakers will continue to grow as we receive confirmations from our invited guests.

David Gessner is the author of nine books, including All the Wild That Remains: Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner and the American West, as well as, My Green Manifesto, and The Tarball Chronicles, which won the 2012 Reed Award for Best Book on the Southern Environment and ASLE’s award for best book of creative writing in 2011 and 2012.

Sharman Russell, author of Diary of a Citizen Scientist: Chasing Tiger Beetles and Other New Ways of Engaging the World (WILLA Award Winner), as well as a dozen other books, writes primarily about nature and the southwest. She makes her home in the Gila.

Lucy Tapahonso, Navajo Nation Poet Laureate, and author of several books of poetry, including The Women are Singing and Blue Horses Rush In. Her poetry is inspired by the idea that the feminine is a source of balance and power in the world.

Priscilla Ybarra, author of The Good Life: Mexican American Writing and the Environment. Dr. Ybarra’s work investigates Mexican American literature and environmental issues, as well as the connections between contemporary Chicana feminist theory and environmental thought. She is a professor of English at the University of North Texas.

Phillip Connors, author of Fire Season: Field Notes From a Wilderness Lookout (National Outdoor Book Award, Sigurd Olsen Nature Writing Award), has spent the last decade as a fire lookout in the Gila National Forest. He previously was an editor at the Wall Street Journal.

Dave Foreman, founder of the direct action environmental group EarthFirst!, has written several books, including Confessions of an Eco-Warrior and Ecodefense: A Field Guide to Monkeywrenching. He is currently the director of the Rewilding Institute, a think tank dedicated to promoting conservation and species extinction.

Travel Awards
We will offer ten awards of $250 each to graduate students and independent scholars to help defray the cost of attending the symposium. Information on how to apply for these awards can be found on the website.

Symposium Location
Western New Mexico University is a diverse, public, regional university with about 3,500 students. Silver City is located in southwestern New Mexico at 6,000 feet elevation. It is the gateway to the Gila National Wilderness Area, the United States’ first wilderness area, as well as Gila Cliff Dwelling National Monument. It is known for its vibrant art community, locavore food scene, and all-around funky downtown. It has been recently named one of the top 20 small towns to visit by Smithsonian Magazine.

CFP: 2001: A Space Odyssey

2016 February 3
by Shared by Steve Rust

Call for Contributors – Abstracts by March 10, 2016.

Critical Insights: 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

Nearly fifty years after its release, Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey remains a turning point in the history of science fiction cinema, and one of the most critically acclaimed science-fiction films ever made.  As such, it’s been chosen by Salem Press for its Critical Insights: Film series (an extension of Salem’s well known CI series in literature).

These volumes are intended for an undergraduate, or upper-level high school, readership – providing key background, context, and analysis for thinking about the film itself, its place in American cinema, and its influences across media.

The structure of the volume is set by Salem to include the following:

  • A 4000-5000 word “Historical Background” chapter that addresses how the time period influenced the development of the film genre across different time periods and cultures, as well as what makes the film relevant to a contemporary audience.
  • A 4000-5000 word “Critical Reception” chapter that surveys major pieces of criticism of the film and the major concerns that critics of the film have attended to over the years.
  • A 4000-5000 word “Critical Lens” chapter that offers a close reading of the film, approaching the theme/genre from a particular critical standpoint.
  • A 4000-5000 word “Comparative Analysis” chapter that analyzes the director in light of another director or offers a comparative analysis of the genre/style across two or three different films that embody the genre.
  • Ten 5000-5500-word chapters on topics related to the film.  These final 10 chapters typically have the normal “edited volume” flexibility in topics and approaches.

Initial drafts will be due July 15, 2016, with final drafts due October 1.  The manuscript is due to the publisher in December 2016, for a mid-2017 publication.  Authors of successfully completed essays will be compensated $250 by Salem Press.

Contact:  A. Bowdoin Van Riper – abvanriper@gmail.com with inquiries

Call for Questions: 2016 Flow Conference

2016 January 28
tags:
by Shared by Steve Rust

FLOWGO

The 2016 Flow Conference Committee invites you to contribute a roundtable question for the 6th Flow Conference, which will be held in Austin, TX, September 15-17, 2016. Finalized questions will be posted by mid-March.

Since its inception, Flow has encouraged scholars to identify and engage with current trends, patterns, and developments within contemporary media. Continuing this proud tradition, the conference welcomes questions addressing recent topics in television and new media studies. As this year’s conference marks the tenth anniversary of the first Flow conference, we especially welcome questions that survey television’s development over the past decade in addition to those questions which look forward and make links with key innovations in new media.

In the spirit of community and collaboration, Flow seeks to foster dialogue among scholars, industry professionals, activists, fans, and policymakers regarding fundamental issues facing television and/or new media as media, culture, and technology. Rather than developing full-length conference presentations, roundtable participants submit short position papers that will be posted online prior to the conference. We encourage those who pose questions to attend, though acceptance of one’s question does not entail one must participate in the conference.

The deadline for questions is Friday, February 26, at which point questions may be edited to meet Flow’s larger objectives. Please submit your proposed roundtable questions through the Google Form link below. For examples, please look through our list of accepted questions from Flow 2014. We are happy to answer any general questions regarding the conference. We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you here in Austin!

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR QUESTION

For updates, please follow us at @FlowConference.

Sincerely yours,

2016 Flow Conference Programming Coordinators

Conference CFP: The Image

2016 January 25
by Shared by Steve Rust
   

Call for Videos: Real Food Films Contest

2016 January 22
by Shared by Steve Rust
Gustolab Institute for Food Studies is delighted to serve as an Anchor School for this year’s Real Food Films Contest, a competition where in the past two years, over 300 filmmakers from around the world have entered the world’s largest short films competition for films on food, farming and sustainability. This fall Real Food Media announced the launch of its third-annual Contest year with a call for submissions of super-short films on underreported issues, unique changemakers and creative solutions to foster a broad, public conversation about the challenges and inspiration at the heart of our food system.

Details about guidelines can be found at www.realfoodfilms.org. Submissions are due by March 1st, 2016 at 9pm PST/12 midnight EST. The top ten finalist films will be announced April 1st, 2016 at Madrone Studios in San Francisco. Awards include a $5,000 Grand Prize, $2,000 for Runner-Up and special awards for Best Cinematography, Underreported Issue, Food Producer Profile, Innovative Initiative and Animation. Media partners include film festivals and online video platform, Vimeo, bringing wide distribution opportunities for films and valuable networks for filmmakers.