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Call for Applications: Race and Animals Summer Institute 2016

2015 August 28

Race and Animals

Summer Institute

June 6-17, 2016

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Deadline December 1, 2015

Lori Gruen, Claire Jean Kim, and Timothy Pachirat invite you to apply for “Race and Animals,” a two-week institute to be held June 6-June 17, 2016, hosted by Wesleyan Animal Studies at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT.

The “Race and Animals” summer institute seeks to foster critical discussions on theoretical, historical, and political understandings of how power works to constitute racialized and animalized subjects.  We encourage applications from:

  1. Those working on current projects addressing the intersection of race studies and animal studies.
  2. Those working on current projects focusing on race who are interested in exploring connections to animal studies.
  3. Those working on current projects focusing on animals who are interested in exploring connections to race studies.

We welcome applications from all fields of study.  Applicants should either have their Ph.D.s or other terminal degrees (e.g., MFAs or JDs) or be advanced graduate students at the ABD stage of their graduate work.

10-12 selected scholars will attend daily lectures and engage in structured daily discussions with the institute organizers and visiting speakers.  They will also have the opportunity to present and receive feedback on their own research.  Required readings will be distributed in advance of the institute.  Participants will be provided with dormitory style housing and will receive $500 each to offset travel expenses.

To apply, please send a single .pdf file containing the following documents to these addresses (lgruen@wesleyan.edu; cjkim@uci.edu ; pachirat@polsci.umass.edu).  Both the subject line of the email and the attached pdf should read “Race and Animals Application- LAST NAME”

  1. A cover letter (not to exceed 750 words) discussing your interest in race studies and animal studies. You should highlight past and current projects of relevance (publications, syllabi, etc.) and offer a concrete explanation of what your unique contribution to the institute would be.
  2. A current curriculum vitae.
  3. A short writing sample or other work product that engages with race studies, animal studies, or both.
  4. The names, institutional affiliations, and email addresses of at least two references.

The deadline for applications is December 1, 2015.

About the Organizers:

Lori Gruen is the William Griffin Professor of Philosophy, Chair of Philosophy, and Professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Environmental Studies at Wesleyan University.  She also coordinates Wesleyan Animal Studies.  She is the author of 3 books, including most recently Entangled Empathy (Lantern, 2015); the editor of 5 books, including The Ethics of Captivity (Oxford, 2014) and Ecofeminism:  Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth with Carol J. Adams (Bloomsbury, 2014).  With Kari Weil, she co-edited “Animal Others” a special issue of Hypatia (2012).

Claire Jean Kim is Professor of Political Science and Asian American Studies at University of California, Irvine, where she teaches classes on comparative race studies, social movements, and human-animal studies.  She is the author of Dangerous Crossings: Race, Species, and Nature in a Multicultural Age (Cambridge, 2015), Bitter Fruit: The Politics of Black-Korean Conflict in New York City (Yale, 2000), and numerous essays on race and animals.  In 2013, she co-guest edited a special issue of American Quarterly entitled, Species/Race/Sex.

Timothy Pachirat teaches in the Department of Political Science at UMass Amherst.  His book, Every Twelve Seconds: Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight (Yale University Press, 2011), is a widely acclaimed political ethnography of the massive, repetitive killing of animals carried out by a largely immigrant workforce.

About the Visiting Speakers:

Colin Dayan is Professor of English, Robert Penn Warren Professor in the Humanities, and Professor of Law at Vanderbilt University. She is the author most recently of With Dogs at the Edge of Life (forthcoming from Columbia University Press in 2015).  She has also authored The Law is a White Dog: How Legal Rituals Make and Unmake Persons (Princeton UP, 2011), a Choice Outstanding Academic book; The Story of Cruel and Unusual (MIT/Boston Review Press, 2007); Haiti, History, and the Gods (University of California Press, 1995, 1998; Fables of Mind: An Inquiry into Poe’s Fiction (Oxford University Press, 1987); A Rainbow for the Christian West (University of Massachusetts Press, 1977).

Maria Elena Garcia is director of the Comparative History of Ideas and associate professor in the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. She received her PhD in Anthropology at Brown University and has been a Mellon Fellow at Wesleyan University and Tufts University. Her first book, Making Indigenous Citizens: Identities, Development, and Multicultural Activism in Peru (Stanford, 2005) examines Indigenous and intercultural politics in Peru. Her work on Indigeneity and interspecies politics in the Andes has appeared in multiple edited volumes and journals such as Anthropology Now, Anthropological Quarterly, International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology, Latin American Perspectives, and Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies. Her second book project, Dancing Guinea Pigs and Other Tales of Race in Peru, examines the intersections of race, species, and capital in contemporary Peru.

Jared Sexton  is Associate Professor of African American Studies at the University of California, Irvine, where he is also affiliated with the Department of Film and Media Studies. He has published articles in journals such as African American ReviewAmerican QuarterlyArt JournalCultural CritiqueRadical History Review, and Social Text, and essays in various anthologies on contemporary politics and popular culture. He is the author of Amalgamation Schemes: Antiblackness and the Critique of Multiracialism and a co-editor of a special issue of Critical Sociology on “Race and the Variations of Discipline,” and has contributed occasional pieces to magazines like ArtforumColorLinesJadaliyya, and openDemocracy.

About Wesleyan Animal Studies:

From 2010-2015, Wesleyan Animal Studies, in partnership with The Animals and Society Institute held an annual summer fellowship program for scholars pursuing research in Human-Animal Studies. The fellowship program was started by the Animals and Society Institute (ASI) in 2007 and directed by Margo DeMello; it was hosted by Lori Gruen and Kari Weil since coming to Wesleyan; and over the years funded over 60 fellows. The ASI-WAS Human Animal Studies Fellowship Program will celebrate its 10th year by hosting a conference at Wesleyan in October 2016.

WAS has sponsored a number of speakers and events, including two conferences, and offers a cluster of courses.

Global Climate Change Week: Connecting online and off

2015 August 24
by smonani

Global Climate Change Week is a new initiative designed to encourage academics in all disciplines and countries to engage with their students and communities on climate change. It will run from October 19-25 this year in the lead-up to the UN Conference of the Parties meeting in Paris in December. This will be the first time that academics from across academia and around the world have united to create such an event.

 For more details see http://globalclimatechangeweek.com/. 162 academics from 35 countries, 6 continents, and a very wide range of disciplines have already registered (see http://globalclimatechangeweek.com/gccw-map/). The organisers urge more academics to so (at http://globalclimatechangeweek.com/register-your-interest/). And please help to spread the word about Global Climate Change Week.

 Please contact Keith Horton (at khorton.at.uow.edu.au) if you have any questions or suggestions.

 

Panel CFP for SCMS 2016

2015 August 19
by Steve Rust

Amy Rust is looking to fill out a panel for SCMS 2016 in Atlanta about SCALE as an aesthetic-ecological concern in moving-image media. If interested, send a 200-word abstract to arust@usf.edu by Sunday, August 23.

New Book: Media and the Ecological Crisis

2015 August 12

Congratulations to Richard Maxwell, Jon Raundalen, and Nina Lager Vestberg on the publication of their new edited collection, Media and the Ecological Crisis (Routledge, 2015). I must admit that this one almost slipped by me and I only heard about it through an email from Amazon. The book’s central focus on the materialist ecologies of media is most welcome indeed. I’m also excited to see scholars interested in linking up the fields of media ecology and ecomedia studies. This will be a fantastic addition to the field!9780415709231

Here is the jacket blurb and table of contents:

Media and the Ecological Crisis is a collaborative work of interdisciplinary writers engaged in mapping, understanding and addressing the complex contribution of media to the current ecological crisis. The book is informed by a fusion of scholarly, practitioner, and activist interests to inform, educate, and advocate for real, environmentally sound changes in design, policy, industrial, and consumer practices. Aligned with an emerging area of scholarship devoted to identifying and analysing the material physical links of media technologies, cultural production, and environment, it contributes to the project of greening media studies by raising awareness of media technology’s concrete environmental effects.

Introduction: Media Ecology Recycled Richard Maxwell, Jon Raundalen, and Nina Lager Vestberg

Part 1: New Media Materialism

1. Powering the Digital: From Energy Ecologies to Electronic Environmentalism Jennifer Gabrys

2. Immaterial Culture? The (Un)Sustainability of Screens Paul Micklethwaite

3. Damaged Nature: The Media Ecology of Auto-destructive Art Synnøve Marie Vik

4. Documenting Depletion: Of Algorithmic Machines, Experience Streams, and Plastic People Soenke Zehle

5. E-Waste, Human-Waste, Infoflation Sophia Kaitatzi-Whitlock

Part 2:New Media Ecology

6. Greening Media Studies Richard Maxwell and Toby Miller

7. Tech Support: How Technological Utopianism in the Media is Driving Consumption Jon Raundalen

8. Where Did Nature Go? Is the Ecological Crisis Perceptible within the Current Theoretical Frameworks of Journalism Research? Roy Krøvel

9. Narrating the Climate Crisis in Africa: The Press, Social Imaginaries and Harsh Realities Ibrahim Saleh

10. Putting the Eco into Media Ecosystems: Bridging Media Practice with Green Cultural Citizenship Antonio López

Chris Palmer at Tedx on Wildlife Filmmaking

2015 August 11
by Steve Rust

Building on the success of his latest book, Confessions of a Wildlife Filmmaker, American University professor Chris Palmer took to the Tedx stage recently and delivered this stirring presentation.

Reposted from: http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Confessions-of-a-Wildlife-Filmm

Television networks like Discovery, Animal Planet, National Geographic, and the History Channel are failing to put conservation, education, and animal welfare ahead of ratings and profits when producing and airing films on wildlife. I believe it’s time for wildlife filmmaking to move in a more ethical direction. Wildlife films should not deceive audiences, harass animals, or avoid conservation.

Video Supervisor: Ford Fischer
Filmed by Arun Raman, Delana Listman, and Elaina Kimes
Edited by Elaina Kimes and Ford Fischer

Recorded in The Harold and Sylvia Greenberg Theatre at American University, Washington, DC

Chris Palmer has spearheaded the production of more than 300 hours of original programming for prime-time television and the giant screen IMAX industry, including the Disney Channel, TBS, Animal Planet, Travel Channel, and PBS. Palmer and his colleagues have won numerous awards, including two Emmys, and an Oscar nomination. He founded the Center for Environmental Filmmaking at American University in 2005, a year after joining AU’s full-time faculty as Distinguished Film Producer in Residence. His book Shooting in the Wild has been made into a film for public television, and his new memoir, Confessions of a Wildlife Filmmaker, has just been published.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Added Jul 10, 2015

CFP: Ecoplay–Digital Games and Environmental Rhetoric

2015 August 3
by smonani

Deadline: October 1, 2015.

The University of Florida’s TRACE journal publishes online peer-reviewed collections in ecology, posthumanism, and media studies. Providing an interdisciplinary forum for scholars, we focus on the ethical and material impact of technology. TRACE Innovation Initiative’s second call for papers, “Ecoplay: Digital Games and Environmental Rhetoric,” focuses on digital games and asks how play contributes to ecological thought.

Building on M. Jimmie Killingsworth and Jacqueline S. Palmer’s Ecospeak: Rhetoric and Environmental Politics in America as well as Sidney I. Dobrin and Sean Morey’s Ecosee: Image, Rhetoric, Nature, this issue proposes “Ecoplay” as a rhetorical framework for investigating the intersection of gameplay and ecocriticism. Both Ecospeak and Ecosee explore how rhetorical forms encourage support and sympathy for environmental movements. Specifically, Ecospeak identifies rhetorical patterns in writing about environmental politics and argues that discourse is a fundamental part of the environmental problem. Meanwhile, Ecosee claims that image-based media plays a powerful role in shaping arguments about ecology, environment, and nature. Examining play as a catalyst for environmental discourse, Ecoplay critically considers existing and potential rhetorics of digital ecologies and evaluates how games make arguments about nature.

Games often perpetuate problematic ideologies about human-nature-technology relationships by offering a platform for environmental consumption, resource management, colonization, cultivation, etc. At the same time, game designers and players can challenge entrenched ecological narratives or promote conservation efforts through digital worlds. TRACE’s “Ecoplay” issue seeks a comprehensive way of engaging the interplay between multiple forms of ecological rhetoric in digital games and ‘plays’ with how the multi-modality of games enables rhetorical forms to interact. Thus, contributions to this issue of TRACE should explore how digital games configure our understandings of ecologies and ecological issues through their design, play, and materiality.

Paper topics may include, but are not limited to, any of the following as they relate to digital games:

  • Ethics and rhetorics of play, interface, or design
  • Representations of nature, ecology, or environment
  • Wildlife or resource management
  • Ecological conservation or preservation
  • “Green” games
  • E-waste and pollution
  • Built environments, construction, and destruction
  • Agriculture, gardening, and urbanization
  • Media ecologies
  • Posthumanism

Completed articles will be peer-reviewed and should be between 3000-6000 words in length. Multimedia submissions are accepted and encouraged. If you are interested in contributing to the TRACE Innovation Initiative’s second issue, please send a 500 word abstract to trace.at.english.ufl.edu by Oct. 1, 2015.

CFP: Political Ecologies Conference

2015 August 1
by Steve Rust

International Conference: Political Ecologies of Conflict, Capitalism and Contestation (PE-3C)

When: 7-9 July 2016

Where: Hotel Wageningse Berg, Wageningen, The Netherlands

Organised by: Wageningen University and School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London

 

We seem to have entered a new phase in the relation between violence and environment. This includes not just unprecedented surges of wildlife crime and associated military style retaliation, but also the conflicts and contestations that arise from structural unequal access to resources (ironically often exacerbated by environmental policies), and the epistemic and intellectual domination of specific ways of understanding, representing and enacting natures, animals and environments. These forms of conflict and violence are (again) becoming an ever more central aspect of the political ecologies of late capitalism and warrant renewed attention, conceptualization and critique.

 

This international conference aims to bring together scholars, activists, non-governmental and governmental change-makers and interested individuals to discuss and increase our understanding of the causes, consequences, natures and politics of these dynamics and so inspire and understand contested 21st century political ecologies. A second objective of the conference is to contribute to a broader understanding of the meaning and nature of political ecology in the 21st century. Political ecology, as the study of how different interests, forms of power and politics influence and frame access to, use and understand the environment, has become a mature field of academic and activist inquiry. One of the untapped strengths of this field is that those who call themselves political ecologists work within a wide variety of different disciplines, traditions and academic cultures. The aim of this conference is to bring these different disciplines, traditions and cultures together and so connect important discussions on the political ecologies of conflict, capitalism and contestation.

 

Paper and Panel themes: proposals for papers and panels are invited that address a combination of the following themes and issues:

* Resources and land use practices including but not limited to: biodiversity and conservation, agriculture, agroecology, forests, water management, marine resources, etc;

* Drivers of violence and conflict such as inequality, resource access, capitalism, markets, governmental policies, ecotourism, militarization, climate change, science and technology, war and crisis, conservation and development programs;

* Forms and conceptions of violence including but not limited to structural and material forms of violence, symbolic and epistemic violence as well as practices of contestation, resistance and the development of alternatives;

* Conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to political ecology and beyond: (post-)structuralist, (post-)Marxist, governance studies, ANT, discourse analysis, governmentality, biopolitics, cultural studies, posthumanist, ethnographic, etc.

 

We invite paper and full panel proposals (with a maximum of 4 paper presentations for 1 panel) for this conference; please send these to politicalecology2016@gmail.com<mailto:politicalecology2016@gmail.com> before 15 December 2015.

 

Keynote speakers: Philippe Le Billon (University of British Colombia, tbc) Elizabeth Lunstrum (York University)

 

Place and venue: beautiful Wageningen is an old, small Dutch city in the centre-east of the Netherlands, but only an hour away from Amsterdam Schiphol airport. Hotel De Wageningse Berg (the Wageningen Mountain) is situated at the edge of town, in the woods, with a magnificent view over the lower Rhine River.

CFP: NESCUS film festival review section

2015 July 29
by smonani

The festival review section of NECSUS: European Journal of Media Studies is accepting submissions for the Fall/Winter 2015 issue.  Deadline: 1 September 2015.

NECSUS is an international, double blind peer-reviewed, open-access journal of media studies connected to NECS (European Network for Cinema and Media Studies) and published by Amsterdam University Press. The journal is multidisciplinary and strives to bring together the best work in the field of media studies across the humanities and social sciences, publishing research that matters and that improves the understanding of media and culture inside and outside the academic community.

The NECSUS film festival review section publishes critical writing on film festivals. It offers a platform for writing that falls between the fast and prolific genre of individual festival reports and the slow and rigorous labor of film festival research. Rather than merely reviewing the latest festival edition, contributors are asked to take a critical distance and reflect upon one or more thematic issues that are relevant to the professional field and/or for media studies. Reviews can be motivated by current affairs but should also tackle issues that tend to remain hidden in the midst of festival buzz. Contributors should not be employed by the festival they are reviewing.

In addition to reviews of single festivals we encourage reviews covering a range of festivals.  We also feature interviews with festival programmers, directors or critics.

For an overview of previous reviews in the section, check here: http://www.necsus-ejms.org/category/reviews/festivalreviews/

General NECSUS submission guidelines apply.  Additional festival review guidelines:

• Maximum 2,500 words

• Focus on up to 3 film festivals

• Include short introductions of the festivals discussed

• Choose one or more issues/themes to structure your critical review

• Provide URLs of the mentioned festivals

• Include your name and affiliation at the end of the review (no short bios needed)

If you are interested in writing a festival review please contact the section editors Marijke de Valck (marijke.at.filmfestivalresearch.org) and Skadi Loist (skadi.at.filmfestivalresearch.org).